In the 2000s, usage of the term "entrepreneurship" expanded to include how and why some individuals (or teams) identify opportunities, evaluate them as viable, and then decide to exploit them.[13] The term has also been used to discuss how people might use these opportunities to develop new products or services, launch new firms or industries, and create wealth.[14] The entrepreneurial process is uncertain because opportunities can only be identified after they have been exploited.[15]
Because smartphones are everywhere, the demand for new and creative apps is increasing in popularity more than ever before. Between Google’s Android and Apple’s iPhone market, people are using countless apps everyday. And, most of them are selling right and left. Taking the time to develop and sell a smartphone app may be worth your while since it’s a very lucrative way to earn money online. The apps cost almost nothing to actually develop and don’t involve any shipping or storage costs, which works to expand your overall profit margin. Well performing apps can make thousands in ad revenue each month for their creators, making them another great passive income strategy.
According to Paul Reynolds, founder of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, "by the time they reach their retirement years, half of all working men in the United States probably have a period of self-employment of one or more years; one in four may have engaged in self-employment for six or more years. Participating in a new business creation is a common activity among U.S. workers over the course of their careers".[36] In recent years, entrepreneurship has been claimed as a major driver of economic growth in both the United States and Western Europe.
The American-born British economist Edith Penrose has highlighted the collective nature of entrepreneurship. She mentions that in modern organizations, human resources need to be combined in order to better capture and create business opportunities.[41] The sociologist Paul DiMaggio (1988:14) has expanded this view to say that "new institutions arise when organized actors with sufficient resources [institutional entrepreneurs] see in them an opportunity to realize interests that they value highly".[42] The notion has been widely applied.[43][44][45][46]
The ability of entrepreneurs to work closely with and take advice from early investors and other partners (i.e. their coachability) has long been considered a critical factor in entrepreneurial success.[82] At the same time, economists have argued that entrepreneurs should not simply act on all advice given to them, even when that advice comes from well-informed sources, because entrepreneurs possess far deeper and richer local knowledge about their own firm than any outsider. Indeed, measures of coachability are not actually predictive of entrepreneurial success (e.g. measured as success in subsequent funding rounds, acquisitions, pivots and firm survival). This research also shows that older and larger founding teams, presumably those with more subject expertise, are less coachable than younger and smaller founding teams.
I used to work at a private university run by priests. Mobbing by the rector was the rule, greed and extorting money from students too, as well as finding ways of not paying the employees (for instance, although Christmas and Easter are bank holidays, they treated them as my personal leave and paid me less). And, as a priest, the rector behaves as if he were above the law. Or maybe it's the Vatican law he obeys, not the Polish law?
C12 is a fee-for-service for-profit organization that operates on membership dues. Prospective members must be invited to join. C12 is a blend of Christian business leadership best practices and general management tools coupled with Godly counsel, accountability, Christian business coaching, a focus on spiritual values and needs, and practical ways to run businesses based on Biblical principles for the eternal benefit of stakeholders.
Leadership in entrepreneurship can be defined as "process of social influence in which one person can enlist the aid and support of others in the accomplishment of a common task"[122] in "one who undertakes innovations, finance and business acumen in an effort to transform innovations into economic goods".[8] This refers to not only the act of entrepreneurship as managing or starting a business, but how one manages to do so by these social processes, or leadership skills. Entrepreneurship in itself can be defined as "the process by which individuals, teams, or organizations identify and pursue entrepreneurial opportunities without being immediately constrained by the resources they currently control".[123] An entrepreneur typically has a mindset that seeks out potential opportunities during uncertain times.[123] An entrepreneur must have leadership skills or qualities to see potential opportunities and act upon them. At the core, an entrepreneur is a decision maker. Such decisions often affect an organization as a whole, which is representative of their leadership amongst the organization.

I overheard my wife talking to a homeschool mom that raises and sells a certain type of dog (a registered breed of some kind) ranging from $1,000 to $1,800. I also know a couple teens that started a bread business where they sell the product at the local famer’s market and local stores. The product(s) have been so successful, most of the family has been involved in it.
The term "ethnic entrepreneurship" refers to self-employed business owners who belong to racial or ethnic minority groups in the United States and Europe. A long tradition of academic research explores the experiences and strategies of ethnic entrepreneurs as they strive to integrate economically into mainstream U.S. or European society. Classic cases include Jewish merchants and tradespeople in large U.S. cities in the 19th and early 20th centuries as well as Chinese and Japanese small business owners (restaurants, farmers, shop owners) on the West Coast.[39] In the 2010s, ethnic entrepreneurship has been studied in the case of Cuban business owners in Miami, Indian motel owners of the U.S. and Chinese business owners in Chinatowns across the United States. While entrepreneurship offers these groups many opportunities for economic advancement, self-employment and business ownership in the United States remain unevenly distributed along racial/ethnic lines.[40] Despite numerous success stories of Asian entrepreneurs, a recent statistical analysis of U.S. census data shows that whites are more likely than Asians, African-Americans and Latinos to be self-employed in high prestige, lucrative industries.[40]
Christian businesses come in all types and sizes, and need a variety of employees. Many small Christian businesses are retail stores, restaurants, cafes, or coffeehouses, while others provide security systems, tax advice, or cleaning services. Just as there are limitless possibilities for secular businesses, there is no limit to the type of business that can be faith-based. As long as the business owners adhere to Biblical principles and require employees to do the same, the business is considered a Christian business. Employees are needed to man cash registers, answer phones, cook and serve food, or otherwise help to meet customers’ needs. Larger Christian businesses such as publishers and manufacturers of Christian products hire the full gamut of employees, from sales representatives and executives to assembly workers and maintenance crew members.
Having a blog may seem like an outdated business strategy, since nearly everybody already has one, but the competition should not deter you from starting this online business journey. If you love writing or have important information to share, blogging may be a profitable business for you. Starting a blog as a business is very simple with website builders like Weebly and WordPress, but the key to success is consistency and quality. To gain a steady following, you must continually write and produce high-quality content that provides value to your readers. Content that educates, informs or entertains your readers gives them a reason to follow you.

Paradoxically, while customers value high-touch telephone access, they also expect a highly polished website. Even if your business isn’t in a high-tech industry, entrepreneurs still must exploit internet technology to get their message across. A startup garage-based business can have a superior website than an established $100 million company. Just make sure a live human being is on the other end of the phone number listed.
Tutors are in high demand whether it’s online or offline. Therefore, if you’ve got a brain and like helping others use theirs, become an e-teacher to earn an extra income in your spare time. The only thing you require is to be proficient in your area of expertise and be willing to give up a few hours each week to help someone else. Sites like Tutor.com and TutorVista are places you can sign up with and build a good reputation over time as a coach. If you’re really good, you can conduct lectures, seminars, or webinars that are transmitted online. University and college students are always willing to pay money to gain access into highly-respected online webinars.
Innovative entrepreneurs may be more likely to experience what psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi calls "flow". "Flow" occurs when an individual forgets about the outside world due to being thoroughly engaged in a process or activity. Csikszentmihalyi suggested that breakthrough innovations tend to occur at the hands of individuals in that state.[113] Other research has concluded that a strong internal motivation is a vital ingredient for breakthrough innovation.[114] Flow can be compared to Maria Montessori's concept of normalization, a state that includes a child's capacity for joyful and lengthy periods of intense concentration.[115] Csikszentmihalyi acknowledged that Montessori's prepared environment offers children opportunities to achieve flow.[116] Thus quality and type of early education may influence entrepreneurial capability.
The bulk of Christian businesses fall into four main categories: retail stores, food and beverage operations, publishers, and manufacturers. Retail stores sell Christian books and gifts as well as items for the home. Christian coffeehouses offer coffee, tea, some food and snacks, and some offer live entertainment on a regular basis. Christian music clubs offer a place for teens and young adults to hang out, dance, and mingle in a safe environment where no alcohol is sold or consumed. Thanks to digital publishing, there are a number of small to mid-sized Christian publishers operating today. Their mission is to publish Christian books, both fiction and non-fiction, which previously may have not been published by large publishing houses. Christian manufacturers produce Christian gifts, t-shirts, and other items sold in retail stores.
You know this one already. You include links to products you are promoting as an affiliate and every time somebody buys the product, you get a commission. With a blog, you can integrate advertising with content to make it even more likely you’ll get the sale. For example, you could do a product review—which is useful content—and then include a link to buy the product under an affiliate link.
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