In-N-Out Burger http://www.in-n-out.com/  also makes its founders' religious leanings part of its recipe. For instance, "John 3:16" appears on the bottom of soft drink cups, a reference to the Bible passage, "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life."

There have been over 100 lawsuits against the contraception coverage mandate in the Affordable Care Act, with a majority of them being filed by so-called “faith-based” businesses. In some cases, with religious educational institutions like Notre Dame, the affiliation makes sense. In others, such as Hobby Lobby, the designation becomes a little more tenuous. After all, does giving millions of dollars in profit to religious groups and organizations really mean that you yourself are a faith-based business? Or does it just mean you’re using your own specific belief system when you are trying to whittle down your profits in order to minimize your tax liability?
Does just being a “religious” owner of a company mean that you get to declare your business to be faith-based? Now, as new lawsuits against the mandate pile up, the correlation of what constitutes a religious business is getting more tenuous. A recent press release announcing yet another suit says it is being filed by a “faith-based car dealership” that says its religious beliefs are being violated by being forced to cover contraception in their health care plans.
You can join their selling program for as low as $199 or up to $499 for their largest starter kit. According to their website, they have an attractive commission program which starts at 25-30%. Braveheart's are provided with their own personal website for sales and services. The first month is free but will cost $9.99 each month after. Grace & Heart does give sales incentives that include trips, leadership training conferences, and team retreats.
"There are more entrepreneurs than investors on the Forbes list of wealthiest people, but that doesn't mean entrepreneurship is necessarily a better wealth builder than investing. There's a selection bias in that entrepreneurs have much more concentrated asset allocation, often having nearly all of their net worth tied up in their own company (and usually not able to sell it very quickly), whereas investors are more diversified. Also, for every entrepreneur who strikes it big there are many others who completely fail, so the list is not a good guide to where the most wealth is being created."

When one of your customers makes a purchase, you purchase the product from a third-party company (the drop shipper, usually a manufacturer or wholesaler) for a lower price. This process is as simple as forwarding the order from your customer, a process that can actually be completely automated. (Remember you don't have any risk here of buying inventory because the sale has already been made).
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